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Diane M. Phillips
443-286-4365
dianejustsold@gmail.com
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Diane M. Phillips
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443-286-4365
dianejustsold@
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How I work   *NEW*

How I workAs a REALTOR® my business puts me in a unique position.  Balancing business productivity and staying safe. Everyday I share my contact information, personal information and frequently, my location in an effort to reach you, potential buyers and sellers. It’s a risky business, in this article I am speaking about the physical dangers, not the financial ones.  

When I decided to go all in and pursue my dream and passion in real estate, I had no concept of  how many dangers lay in my path. Through the public's expectations and my own desire to serve and be available I had to  learn where to draw the line.

Think about it for a moment, open houses, personal marketing, meeting strangers, entering vacant homes. At face value these tasks are harmless right? Security experts consider real estate a high-risk profession.

The 6 Most Dangerous situations a REALTOR® encounters on a daily basis.

  1. Meeting a new potential client for the first time (aka complete strangers)

  2. Entering foreclosed or vacant homes

  3. Showing Property alone

  4. Open Houses

  5. Personal Marketing

  6. Transporting Strangers in my car

 

Here’s how I work:

  1. Meeting new potential clients for the first time - you will be asked to provide photo ID in advance. We will schedule a first time face to face meeting in a public place to ensure your awareness of real estate processes and to keep us both safe.

  2. Communication - From the start good solid communication has to be established. With the many communication tools available to us today, we should be able to establish a communication plan that keeps both of us in the know.

  3. Showing  property, foreclosed or vacant homes - only after we have met and established a relationship. If I am previewing a property for a relocation client I will not go alone.

  4. Open Houses - 48% of home buyers used open houses as a source of information in their home search. I love open houses! An open house should be a community event. My only requirement, I will have someone with me.

  5. Personal Marketing -  I am honest, truthful and transparent in my marketing. I don’t care for a lot of fluff or “bling.” My website, facebook and twitter are all about the business of real estate and a little fun and personal info sprinkled in on pinterest.

  6. Transporting customers, clients or strangers my car - Never. Besides the safety issue, navigating from property to property on a tight schedule is challenging enough. Add in Fair Housing laws that are easy to comply with until it comes to the car. Essentially, treat everyone the same. If I can’t take every client every time I can take no one.

 

Sure it’s easy to take that couple or the single buyer in my car and go zip around and show property. What about the family of with two or three children in car seats? I can’t accommodate the seating requirements for children according to MD Child passenger Safety Laws AND I’d be violating Fair Housing Laws specifically Familial Status. That’s not going to happen.

 

 

See the dangers for yourself, real life examples:

Realtor’s client murdered during home showing

Risky business: Real estate agent’s killing hits home for REALTORS

Yes, Real Estate agents say, our job can be really dangerous.

Realtor attacked during a showing in Bradenton

Realtors on alert after two incidents in Butler County

Female real estate agent attacked by a man dressed as a woman

Suspect held in real estate agent’s killing

Real Stories of Real Estate Risk from across the country and right here at home:

 

  • July 2004, Baltimore, MD-- Maryland State Police warned REALTOR®’s about a man who allegedly injured one agent and could be stalking others. A female agent was assaulted during an open house by a visitor who looked around the house then picked up an object and struck the agent on the back of the head. Police had first viewed it as an isolated incident but other agents reported a man matching the description had attended open houses in the area and in one case tried to lure the host agent into an isolated part of the house. The agent who was hit was able to fend off her attacker but police believe it was intended as a sexual assault.

 

  • BALTIMORE, MD 10/25/2004 - Man Confesses To Assaulting Real Estate Agent -- A Carroll County man faces charges after reportedly confessing to assaulting a real estate agent earlier this year in Sykesville. Maryland State Police identified the man as Kent E. Stover, 37, of Sykesville. Police said that after an interrogation, Stover confessed late Sunday to assaulting a real estate agent. Troopers said the investigation began on April 15 when Stover allegedly walked through a model home unaccompanied in the 700 block of Old Liberty Road in Sykesville. Authorities said that Stover then struck a female real estate agent on the head using a decorative metal ball displayed inside the house.